PrEP FAQ’s

Pre Exposure Prophylaxis, PrEP, is a revolutionary once-a-day pill that, when taken as instructed, greatly lowers any and all chances that someone can contract HIV even if they get exposed to it. It takes a week of consistency to protect you during anal sex and 21 days to protect you during vaginal sex or intravenous drug use. When taken daily, PrEP is 99% effective in keeping you safe.

In order for it to be as effective, efficient, and reliable, yes, you do. If PrEP is your only once-a-day medication then it is important you take it at the same time every day. Some people like to take it before bed and some like to have it with their morning coffee. Building it into your routine will help ensure that you never forget to take it.

Once you have been consistent with taking PrEP, if you miss a single day, you do not need to panic. This happens and you will be fine. Now, if a situation arises where you miss multiple doses or begin taking it with infrequency, the effectiveness decreases greatly and cannot guarantee you the same protection level that daily use does.

With any medication side effects can present themselves. While starting out with PrEP, some have experienced: nausea, tiredness, gastrointestinal issues and headaches. In some instances, people have had issues with their kidneys or bones, though these issues would not be permanent if you had to stop taking PrEP. These issues will be monitored while you remain on PrEP as you will have to go in for blood work every three months to renew your prescription. If any side effects or symptoms last too long, consult your doctor or medical professional.

PrEP needs to be prescribed by a licensed medical provider. A lot of people go to their primary care physician but there are other options, such as local community health organizations, for people who don’t have the insurance or income for consistent medical care. If you want to get on PrEP there will always be a way in which to do so.

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Nearly all insurance plans cover PrEP and have to by law, as well as the bloodwork associated with it. There are also ways for any remaining costs to be covered by programs such a Gilead’s co-pay assistance program.

While both are created by Gilead Sciences and have FDA approval, there are some key differences:

  • Truvada is effective for everyone, while Descovy has, so far, only been be proven most effective for cisgender men and trans women.
  • Descovy is easier on the kidneys and bones.

Despite any differences, both have the same effective HIV prevention rate of 99%.

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While the number remains low, yes, it has happened in rare instances for varying reasons. Since PrEP became FDA approved and available to the public there have been less than 15 instances of this occurring. The cases are always explored and researched in an effort to make PrEP safer and more effective. If this is a concern, please discuss with your medical provider.
If you are not on PrEP, but have a possible HIV exposure, go to a medical provider to get on a Post Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP) treatment within 72 hours of exposure. Getting on this treatment quickly is highly effective at preventing sero-conversion (going from HIV negative to HIV positive).
That is entirely up to you. While safe sex practices have evolved beyond just condoms, unfortunately there is not a miracle pill to prevent all STD/STIs yet. PrEP is only effective against HIV and condoms remain the only means of preventing other STD/STIs. The CDC recommends using both as a means of total sexual health safety.

Nearly all insurance plans cover PrEP and have to by law, as well as the bloodwork associated with it. There are also ways for any remaining costs to be covered by programs such a Gilead’s co-pay assistance program.

While both are created by Gilead Sciences and have FDA approval, there are some key differences:

  • Truvada is effective for everyone, while Descovy has, so far, only been be proven most effective for cisgender men and trans women.
  • Descovy is easier on the kidneys and bones.

Despite any differences, both have the same effective HIV prevention rate of 99%.

READ MORE
While the number remains low, yes, it has happened in rare instances for varying reasons. Since PrEP became FDA approved and available to the public there have been less than 15 instances of this occurring. The cases are always explored and researched in an effort to make PrEP safer and more effective. If this is a concern, please discuss with your medical provider.
If you are not on PrEP, but have a possible HIV exposure, go to a medical provider to get on a Post Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP) treatment within 72 hours of exposure. Getting on this treatment quickly is highly effective at preventing sero-conversion (going from HIV negative to HIV positive).
That is entirely up to you. While safe sex practices have evolved beyond just condoms, unfortunately there is not a miracle pill to prevent all STD/STIs yet. PrEP is only effective against HIV and condoms remain the only means of preventing other STD/STIs. The CDC recommends using both as a means of total sexual health safety.

Makes It Easy!

We offer multiple ways to be seen by a medical professional. Whether you prefer to see a doctor in person or from the comfort of your own home, GotPrEP.com wants to work with what works for you.

Are you a one stop shop kind of person?

Well, then an in-person clinic visit is right for you! During your visit, you will get face time with a doctor ready to make sure PrEP is right for you, get your lab work done, and receive your prescription in the mail.

Are you a person on the go and can’t come to a clinic?

Well then let the clinic come to you! Once you do your virtual visit, with a doctor, we can send you an at-home test kit that you send back to us or a member of our highly trained team of nurses will come to you to do the lab work.

Regardless of which option you choose GotPrEP.com is committed to making sure the process feels effortless.

Your sexual health is as much of a priority to us as it is to you.

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